The Tragedy of the Holocaust

There is no more chilling event in the history of the world such as the holocaust. The holocaust took place in the heat of the Second World War. Many innocent people lost their lives in it. Victims included Sinti, Roma, Slavic, French and Dutch people. However, the Jews bared the brute of the holocaust. They were killed in larger number than any other community in Europe. Many of them lost their lives, in some cases, entire families were wiped out. The word "Holocaust" originated from Greek and it means "Sacrifice by fire." Therefore, the Nazi who perpetrated killing were doing a kind of sacrifice. It is, thus, not surprising that the exterminations were bureaucratic, systematic, and state-sponsored and ended the lives of over six million innocent Jews, and permanently affected those that survived. In this regard the holocaust was a product of Nazi hate, executed through Nazi atrocities, betraying the Jewish people and resulted in a long lasting impression on the world.

When the Nazi came to power in 1933, no one could have predicted what they would do during their tenure at the helm. However, all this became clear when their atrocities started unfolding. First, their belief that the Jewish people were inferior while the German race was superior, which they had been holding on for a long time grew. The German authorities, thus, went on to target the communities that were thought inferior to cleanse their superior race. They also had hatred toward other communities especially the Jews who were very successful politically and economically (Spiegelman Mous I 12). It is this hatred the likely led to the propaganda of superiority and inferiority of races. Finally, the Nazi blamed the Jewish for the loss they suffered during the First World War. They were blamed for almost everything including a plan to take over the world, being communist deliberately causing the greater depression, and being responsible for all economic and political challenges Germany experienced (Spiegelman Mous II 47). The Jews found themselves on the receiving end with no ability to fight back.

The Jews were betrayed. There we very few people who would to welcome them and offer them a refuge (Wiesel, 16). History documents that the Jews got betrayed by their friends and neighbors at a time when the needed all the help they could get. Germany as a country betrayed the Jews who were its loyal citizens (Spiegelman Mous I 33). Other nations that were in a position seemingly turned their back on the Jews. In fact, in 1938, during the heat of the holocaust, representatives of 32 countries met for nine day in France to deliberate the Jewish refuge quagmire. Despite being informed, they did not treat what was happening seriously. The failure of these countries to declare a stand gave Hitler the permission he needed to continue with the persecution.

Even though the war was over when it did, the impacts of the holocaust were lasting and still cause chills whenever they are revisited. Survivors were left by many physical and emotional scars and children sometime had numerous terrifying flashbacks. Many families were torn apart (Spiegelman Mous I 158). Some regions of Russia where large populations of Jews were exterminated, have predominantly lagged behind economic-wise, since despite the Jews being the minority, they comprised most of the educated and middleclass citizens at the time. Worldwide most people took cue from the event, which still has strong significance in world political and domestic politics within countries.

In conclusion, the holocaust remains the most chilling event the world has ever witnessed. It was propagated by the Nazi due to their hatred of the Jews and the blame and propaganda that the Nazi made against them. The Jews suffered the greatest betrayal ever noted in history from their friend, neighbors, country and the world. When it was all over, memories of the past lingered on to haunt the Jews and the world at large.