Crime Control

The most effective crime control strategy is a product of the government and community effort. For example, the US government has a history of prioritizing the use of legislative mechanisms and other methods of supervision, incapacitation, and restraint. Deterrence theory proposes that crimes can be prevented when offenders perceive the cost of committing a crime as higher than they gain. Control strategies that function to deter motivation of crime are general and specific. General mechanisms for deterrence gives a notion that dissuades the general population from committing a crime when it perceives that penalty inevitably succeeds an act of crime. On the other hand, specific control is characterized by the punishment accorded to offenders with the purpose of inhibiting them from participating in lawless activities in the future.

Legislation

The law is a powerful tool when it comes to crime control, and this is a tool that has been used and continues to be used extensively in the world to deter crime. Legislation like the violence against Women's Act that was amended in 2000, assigned money to look into confronting violence against women, established new penitentiaries and hired a new batch of one hundred thousand police officers. Another exemplary legislation is the Megan's law at the state level, the mandatory minimum sentences, three-strike laws and capital punishments that criminals should be given. It also empowers law enforcers to carry out their duties more effectively and ensure the community benefits from the improved crime control measures. It is, therefore, vital for legislation to evolve according to changes in criminal activities witnessed today so as to provide relevant solutions.

Incarceration

This is a crime control strategy that is as a result of the legislative measures put in place whose biggest effect has been registered in the disciplinary frame. A plan to lengthen jail terms and harden terms of exoneration will definitely discourage people from rushing to criminal activities. In addition, increasing the range of crimes punishable by incarceration will deter people from engaging in crimes previously considered "less punishable".

Probation and Parole

These are the most utilized forms of crime control that are based on community corrections. Offenders are supervised within a community context. Parole involves the watched discharge of an offender before the completion of his/her jail sentence. On the other hand, probation functions as a substitute to incarceration. Both probation and parole are accompanied by conditions to restrain offenders, but most of all they have to keep routine contact with their supervision officers. The best way of optimizing the efficacy of these crime control measures is to equip probation/parole officers with counselling skills, who are able to relate with offenders in a better way rather than watching the offenders activity. In order to discourage crimes punishable this way, the restrictions accompanying parole and probation can be increased.

Technology

Technology can be utilized to monitor, arrest and suppress an offender that helps optimize the available resources. For example, in a case where the villain has escaped, technology can be used to find and incapacitate them. New technology continues to evolve and at the moment, law enforcers have a method of disabling a fleeing vehicle. Research shows that effective crime control plans include treatment and control. At the moment, the US houses about 2 million offenders in its penal institutions (Clear and Dammer, 2002).

This happens despite the fact that the US has one of the toughest punitive measures against crime in the world. Therefore, special correction facilities should be added in order to deal with offenders who have specific needs, like drug abusing offenders.