Poetry Project

We Real Cool is a poem written in the 1960s by Gwendolyn Brooks. The poem criticizes youth who lead a life not considering the consequences of their actions. It brings out the recklessness of the youth who anticipate any unfortunate accidents that may befall them in their uncontrolled lifestyles. Although, the poem is brief, it has a stern statement warning the youth of the calamities waiting to befall them if they did not reform. The author shows of the youth"s desire to live a luxurious life through statements such as "The Pool Players" and "Seven at the Golden Shovel".

Gwendolyn Brooks employs the use of both rhyme scheme and alliteration. First, "The Pool Players" refers to a practical world term that the youth use to create an identity. However, they do it because they believe it is fashionable to do so and boosts their egos. Secondly, the word "Seven" implies to unity or completeness. It can refer to seven colors of the rainbow, implying unity in the sense of the seven colors clinging together. On the other hand, it can refer to the completeness of work if compared to the six days of creation and had a rest on the seventh day according to the Bible story of creation. However, the youths in the poem have ignored hard work and instead dropped out of school to pursue earthly pleasures.

Finally, "The Golden Shovel" is to show what the youths value instead. The term "golden" refers to the fast wealth the youth hope to generate from their activities. The author also uses it in a way to warn the youths that all that shines is not gold. Instead of leading them to their much desired material wealth and pleasure, the result is death. The author uses the words "sin" and "gin" to visualize lifestyles of proud school dropouts. In a straight forward language, she criticizes their self-obsession and lack of education.

Christopher Marlowe"s poem The Passionate Shepherd to his Love is an emotional personal account of his love. The author uses stylistic devices to achieve his means, that is, to show his love. The poet describes a country -side setting which he intends to use in drawing the pictures of pleasure with his love. He shows this in the poem through his use of the words "pleasures prove". He intends to use nature to entertain himself and his lover. It is clear while reading the poem that he invites her to sit with him on the rocks and by the river as they are watching the shepherds.

The writer"s environment visualization is through the use of certain words. For example, in the promises he makes to his loved one. He promises to make "beds of roses", "kirtle embroidered with leaves of myrtle" and "gown made of the finest wool". The use of these terms draws the conclusion that it is a rural setting and he is a shepherd. However, through the description of other materials and terms beyond the scope of a shepherd, we conclude that the author himself may not be a shepherd. The words include "buckles of the purest gold", "coral clasps" and "amber studs".

Marlowe uses the term "shepherd" metaphorically. The shepherd is not a real character, but a convenient verse. He uses the shepherd and expressions of romance to create an illusion of paradise for the reader. The shepherd will rejoice and sing for the two each morning. This is seen from the statement "the shepherds swains shall dance and sing". Thus, the author places shepherds in gentleman"s class at the time. The poet is not sure the woman would appreciate the environment. However, because the writer constructs the promises on ideals, the poem ends in a slightly sad mood.

Sir Walter Raleigh"s sequel to Christopher Marlowe"s poem The Nymph is a reply to the "Shepherd". It is a reaction piece criticizing Marlowe"s for his naivety and lack of touch with reality. All the enticements to his lady would materialize only if the world and love itself remained young. The author argues of the constantly changing circumstances; therefore, he shows of the transitory nature of the promises. He expects the shepherd"s promises to lose relevance with time and wither. Just as the roses fade, shallow rivers rage, and rocks grow cold, he expects the love not to last.

The author is of the idea that love does not last long, and is doomed to fail at birth. His idea of a constantly fluxing time describes only the two periods: spring and wither. This is to show the consequences that will follow their unthoughtful acts. He describes the world as full of sin such as dishonesty. For example, the shepherds themselves lie.We live in a world that is full of free love in the grass as the spring season does not last for long.

He uses same words and meter to criticize Marlowe"s poem effectively. The terms such as rock, fields, flocks, rivers and birds describe pure love in Marlowe"s poem. However, Raleigh"s poem uses them to describe the obsolete situation. Such terms as, rocks grow cold, rivers rage and flocks are driven to fold, show of the changing world. The use of the character Philomel in Sir Raleigh"s poem shows his narrow perspective of their love. Philomel is a female character in another story who was raped and forcefully turned to a nightingale. Therefore, he does not believe the female character will trust Marlowe"s promises.